Posts for tag: bonding

By drglasmeier
February 06, 2012
Category: Uncategorized

What is chairside veneer? A tooth colored facing that can be bonded to the tooth to improve the esthetics of a tooth. Whether an old discolored filling, small chip or slightly crooked tooth, a chairside veneer can be placed over the existing tooth with immediate esthetics!

How is it different from a traditional porcelain veneer? There is no lab bill so the cost is reduced significantly and you get immediate results. There is very minimal prepping(drilling) of the tooth and no impressions or temporaries. Chairside veneers are easier to repair.

Do I need to have my teeth drilled or do I need shots? To get the most esthetic outcome, the answer is typically yes but in certain circumstances(position of the teeth) you can get the veneers without numbing or drilling. It is typically determined on a case to case basis.

Can I get chairside veneers if I grind my teeth? Yes you can because the facing is bonded to the front of the tooth. The front of the tooth does not participate in biting so they are safer from “grinders and clenchers”.

What is the approximate cost of a chairside veneer? Cost is ~ ½ the cost of a porcelain lab veneer which is around $600-800/veneer.

 

How long do chairside veneer last? Much like fillings and traditional veneers, chairside veneers should last around 6-8 years assuming good hygiene and regular checkups.

 

Talk to Dr.Glasmeier about Chairside veneers!

Is it necessary to replace silver fillings that are not bothering me?

 

Absolutely not. I kind of like the "If it's not broke, don't fix it" attitude. But I will try and explain further. There are many dentists who are urging patients to replace all the silver fillings in their mouth without a reasonable explanation why. There is a lot of controversy and literature that suggests the harmful effects of silver fillings can cause multiple health problems. More specifically, critics state the small amounts of mercury in the silver restorations can be potentially harmful leading to neuropathies.

 

Neuropathies are nonspecific disorders that can affect the nervous system and brain which alter things such as vision, memory, sense of smell and taste, etc. While mercury has been shown to demonstrate potentially harmful effects if exposed in large amounts, there is not enough conclusive evidence to deter dentists from still routinely placing silver fillings. If in doubt, you can consult the American Dental Association and the FDA as they still support the use of silver fillings as an acceptable restoration in dentistry.

 

So why should silver fillings be replaced?

 

Silver fillings should be replaced if they develop cavities around them. If the silver fillings(amalgams) chip, fracture, break, or develop symptoms such as cold/biting sensitivity, then it is acceptable to replace the fillings. In these cases, a tooth colored filling (aka "composite") would typically be used to restore the tooth back to function.

 

Is there any harm in replacing my silver fillings if they don't bother me?

 

Depending on the size of the filling and location, there is always a chance of sensitivity developing following replacement of the filling as with any other filling. This should be discussed at detail with your dentist prior to replacements. If the filling is more than 50% of the tooth, then a crown may be necessary to restore the tooth back to function as well as recreating an esthetic appearance.

 

If silver fillings are safe then why do you not do them on a regular basis?

 

Two simple reasons:

 

1. There are environmental hazards associated with disposing of silver filling material in the garbage. This is one of the few dental materials that has specific instructions for disposal requiring special filters/traps as well as pickup services that is not only expensive but time consuming.

 

2. Most patients simply do not want them! Less than 5% of the general public prefer silver fillings or the tooth colored kind. It becomes a supply and demand issue where there is no demand.

 

What happens if I whiten my teeth following my white fillings being placed?

 

Tooth colored fillings, much like crowns, dentures, bridges and veneers will not respond to teeth whitening like natural teeth. It is for this reason that tooth colored fillings that will be placed on the front teeth will typically follow teeth whitening so that the fillings will not have to be redone. Back teeth have less issues with esthetics simply because of their position, therefore not as critical.

Question: Hi Dr.Glasmeier,

 

My son is 9 years old and has a big space between his front teeth and it seems bigger than his siblings' spaces. I want to know if this will resolve on his own or he is going to need dental work to correct this space?

 

Answer: Spacing between the two front teeth (known as a "diastema") is a very common finding not only in children but adults as well. Children who have baby teeth with type of spacing is actually a good situation however if this occurs with the eruption of the permanent teeth, this is quite different.

 

There are many different factors that can contribute to abnormal spacing between the two front teeth. The one I most commonly see is what is called a "low frenum attachment". The frenum is the soft tissue that attaches the inside of your lip to the gums above or below your teeth. Normally the frenum attaches high up above the tooth but it can also much lower on the gums between the teeth. When the gum attaches between the teeth, it can result in a diastema(space between the teeth).

 

When this occurs, typically two things must happen to close the space:

1. Patient needs to be evaluated to determine whether or not

orthodontics(braces) will be necessary to close the space or if they can be

closed by other means (e.g. veneers).

2. Patient will likely require a frenulectomy, where the soft tissue attachment

between the teeth is removed or reduced. There are multiple ways this is

accomplished but the most common is with a laser. With a little local

anesthesia and a laser, this procedure can be accomplished in several

minutes pain free and with little, if any postop pain. Most children have no

pain or discomfort the next day!

 

So back to your question, yes it can be treated but he needs to be evaluated the best way to accomplish this. Consult your dentist for the course of treatment necessary!

 

Best of luck!

Dr.G